Government Fair Allows Students to Interact, Explore Interests

(Photo by Chris Samuels)
Rory Penman
(Photo by Chris Samuels)
(Photo by Chris Samuels)

The Union Saltair Room was filled with representatives from prominent local and national government agencies on Thursday as part of a Government Career Fair.


The event, hosted by the U’s Career Services Office, hosted over 25 groups, such as the U.S. Postal Service, the Peace Corps and the Department of Veteran Affairs, so students could interact with representatives and possibly find jobs.

Damien Pitts, a career counselor and government liaison for the Career Services Office, said he was pleased that about 100 students showed up. He was worried no one would come because the event had not been heavily advertised on campus. This is the first year they’ve held a career fair centered on government agencies.

“An event of this nature is important for two major reasons,” Pitts said. “First, it expands the knowledge of what kinds of jobs are really available to students post-graduation. Career paths are not always linear. Second, this event can help students find jobs that are specific to their major. It can also open their eyes to other possibilities.”

The U’s S.J. Quinney College of Law tabled at the fair, and Aretha Minor, the associate director for admissions at the U, said the intention was to support students.

“Many of the students who get a degree in law have an interest in government-related jobs,” Minor said. “We are here to support them and aid them in that search.”

Jess Hofberger, the director of professional development for S.J. Quinney College of Law, said students should pay special attention to their résumé if they wish to gain a job with a government agency.

“Students really need to cut down on the fluff,” Hofberger said. “The government agencies are more focused on your commitment to what the agency does.”

Jamie Seavello, transition coordinator with the U.S. Postal Service, said one of the key things these agencies look for is applicants with a diverse set of life and employment skills.

“We are looking to hire people who will become future leaders in our agency,” Seavello said. “We seek to provide an open dialogue so students know our expectations and we know theirs.”



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