Fratkin a Disgrace

By [email protected]

April 9, 2003

The Daily Utah Chronicle200 South Central Campus Drive #236Salt Lake City, UT 84112

Letter to the Editor:

As a matter of practice I rarely, and actually have never, written in response to anything that appears in the media, but the Chronicles recent article and accompanying opinion piece involving Beth Fratkin moved me to forward my opinion.

Fratkin does have the right to impart her own opinion, but should she do so by desecrating the flag of the United States? Her basis for this desecration according to the recent article in the Chronicle, is because she is frustrated in not &being heard&, and &disagrees with the policies of President Bush.&

The United States flag represents much more than &President Bush&s policies&. Because you can burn, destroy and desecrate the flag doesn&t mean you should do it. The flag represents much more than the &policies of President Bush&, and I am personally offended by Fratkin&s cheap attempt at gaining publicity for her views. As a student at the University of Utah, I am ashamed to be associated with Fratkin, the Chronicle and the University in this manner. I utterly disagree with the Chronicle&s View, that Fratkin &sets a wonderful example for both her students and all students at the U to follow&. Desecrating the flag may be her meager attempt to gain the &attention& she wants for &students&, but frankly I do not condone or have to accept her behavior, much less appreciate the Chronicle giving her, &her desired publicity&.

Kudos to Beth Fratkin? Maybe the Chronicle should spend more time pursing stories of Utahns& that actually contribute to the freedom of the United States and the rest of the world. This morning as I watched United States Marine forces and Iraqi citizens pull down a statue of Sadaam Hussein in downtown Baghdad, I thought of those who have gave their lives in the name of freedom, and under the flag of the United States of America. To have to desecrate the flag in order to &solve your frustration of not being heard&, is a sad commentary on &how far we have come&.

The day before we prepare to bury Sgt. James Cawley, the first Utahn killed in action in the Iraqi War, I think of his sacrifice and the statement his life makes, rather than the statements of those who refuse to act in the name of freedom.

Kudos? How about kudos to Sgt. Cawley and the men and women of the armed services who lay their lives on the line daily in our defense?

Jeremy ShawUniversity of Utah Graduate Student