Letter to the Editor: My own Things That Must Go and Thumbs Up, Thumbs Down

Editor:

After reading Wednesday’s Chronicle (“The Macs vs. Windows debate is a waste of time,” April 13), I made a list of Things That Must Go:

Wal-Mart: Big business is great sometimes as long as it doesn’t get too big.

KFC: Mistreatment of animals, chickens on steroids-I can barely stand to look at people on steroids, so who wants to eat super chicken?

Gas: Ideally I’d give it up, but then how would I do anything cool on the weekends? Until we get mass production of alternative fuels this is harder to come by.

Gambling: In computer simulations I had increased my chances to 51 percent if I picked the right cards based on different factors. Unfortunately, with these odds, I’d still lose any money I had before I made anything significant. Unless I had a lot of money, placed small bets and had a lot of time.

International class: Seems like a fine way to lengthen schooling, if you don’t mind learning less. Granted, Americans may not know where Czechoslovakia is, but Czechs probably don’t know where Utah is, either.

Parking structure: I park at the LDS Institute. What do I care? I wouldn’t mind a parking structure being built; just stop using our student fees to rebuild the same sidewalks every six months.

The bookstore: Avoided if I can get books cheaper anywhere else. It is a private company, isn’t it? Then it should be a competitive private company.

Styrofoam cups and plates: The stuff gathers in your body. Plus the process making it creates toxic waste.

Wow. That was a bit on the downside. On the upside:

The Chrony’s awards, Alex Lowe’s student involvement website, posters and presentations of research, the inauguration, decent weather, the Marriott Library (always a good place to get more information) and on.

Windows or Mac: It’s like apples and oranges. They are better at different things. If Macs had a larger consumer base, I’m sure they’d have just as many flaws as windows. Personally, I like Linux.

Josh Kaggie

Senior, Physics