Help a good idea work out: Attend the State of ASUU Address

It’s not everyday that our leaders–in any sphere of our lives–take steps to hold themselves more accountable. Without exception we should embrace such efforts, while thanking those rare figures for having the modesty to concede that constituents might also have some ideas about what needs to be done.

Associated Students of the University of Utah President Jake Kirkham’s creation of the “State of the ASUU Address” provides a new outlet for students to voice concerns to their elected leaders. In the past, students would find themselves inundated by propaganda and campaign promises every April, before ASUU suddenly disappeared from the face of the campus like a migrating cycle of locusts, promising to return anew the following spring.

Kirkham’s idea could help change that perception.

At Kirkham’s address (tonight from 8 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. in the Union Ballroom), all students are encouraged to bring up issues most important to them, and to assess the current efforts and goals of the student leaders.

In addition to Kirkham’s address, additional representatives from all three branches of student government will be on hand for remarks, and all will talk to students once their speeches are over. Students who are unsure what it is ASUU even does can stop by and pick up pamphlets explaining the structure and function of the student government at the U.

Every year the biggest criticism levied against ASUU is that they aren’t open to student input. It’s kind of a shame they chose the week before Thanksgiving Break to open up, but there aren’t exactly a lot of convenient times for college students, either.

If you really care about making your imprint on the U in you college career, it makes sense to sacrifice a little time to stop in and check it out. It’s your one chance.

You should be interested because the things that ASUU does affect you. ASUU controls a lot of money that affects events and programs at our school. Many of their decisions will come to shape your university experience. And, if you scoff at that and say, “Not me, they don’t do anything for me,” you have even more reason to stop by and explain your point of view.

Otherwise, our message to student leaders is that they can say whatever they want at election time, so long as they win. They won’t ever actually have to back anything up.