Executive MBA program ranked no. 35 in nation

By By Edgar Zuniga Jr.

By Edgar Zuniga Jr.

The Financial Times recently ranked the U’s Executive Master’s of Business Administration program among the best in the world. The British newspaper ranked the U’s program 35th in the United States and 74th in the world.

“The Financial Times ranking is a reflection of our growing stature as one of the world’s leading resources for an Executive MBA,” said Brad Vierig, assistant dean and director of the U’s Executive MBA program, in a statement. “We are preparing leaders to solve the most important problems both domestically and internationally.”

This is the third-consecutive year the Financial Times has placed the U’s Executive MBA program on its list, which also ranked the U’s faculty research output 24th in the country.

Vierig said the ranking is significant because the paper is very thorough with its research.

“(The) Financial Times (measures) faculty productivity (and) student outcome,” said Vierig. “For us it is real recognition that we are achieving excellence in what we do.”

The publication also studies alumni satisfaction and salary, among other factors. The publication based its ranking on information gathered from the Executive MBA graduating class of 2004. According to the survey, the 2004 class’s average salary after completion of the program was $115,660.

Jerry Jensen graduated from the U’s Executive MBA program in 2003. With his previous experience in the corporate world and his son Benjamin Jensen’s physical therapy degree, Jerry Jensen opened a physical therapy clinic in Lehi. Jerry and Benjamin Jensen also operate Worksite Health, a regional work health services provider.

“(The Executive MBA program) has helped me solidify my work in my own business and it gave me a better idea of how to do things-it’s been really helpful,” Jerry Jensen said.

The Executive MBA program is unique because it allows experienced professionals to obtain a degree in a shorter amount of time. Vierig said the average student age in the program is 40 and all students have a minimum of six years of experience working in the corporate world, with an average of 13 years of experience. The program lasts 21 months. In the traditional program, students need two to four years to obtain an MBA.

The program consists of two one-week intensive sessions, weekend classes and an international field study. Students have visited Asia, Europe and Latin America. Vierig said because of the caliber of the program some students have commuted weekly from neighboring states to study in the program. Most students live and work along the Wasatch Front.

“Courses are taught by world-class faculty and professionals who are absolutely committed to giving the very best to our business professionals,” said Jack Brittain, dean of the School of Business, in a statement. “This is what matters and it is what has helped the EMBA program attain a reputation for excellence.”

The School of Business will hold Executive MBA information sessions Thursday, Nov. 15 and Thursday, Dec. 13 at 5:30 p.m.

For more information, visit the program’s website, www.emba.utah.edu.

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