Bailey: The best policy is open dialogue

By By Ben Bailey and By Ben Bailey

By Ben Bailey

I dig the new John Mayer single “Say.” It deals with an idea that I feel is important but is not followed closely by our society: “Say what you need to say.”

Sometimes it is sad to think that we live in such a politically correct society. We provide a disclaimer to Mayer’s lyrics: “Say what you need to say, but say it as indirectly and abstractly as possible.”

This is the case with a recent statement made by Barack Obama’s pastor, the Rev. Jeremiah Wright. His statements were racial and controversial, but at least they were out there in the open.

Communication is hard enough as it is because words are just symbols of what we actually mean. When we cloud them up with indirect and politically correct terminology, it is just that much more difficult. I understand there is merit in being polite, but there is also merit in being honest.

I wonder sometimes at how insincere we have become in our social and political atmosphere. I must admit it is nice to hear almost any opinion that is straightforward.

Speaking what you are feeling is a lot easier, despite all the fears attached to it. Sadly, it seems that actually understanding how someone feels has become a novelty in our day, especially when we’re considering political candidates.

Watching a few speeches or reading pamphlets makes me sick. Candidates are way too afraid to be offensive because they might lose votes. Most build off the things that everyone already accepts and therefore accomplish nothing.

If they do have an opinion that not everyone agrees with, they put it in such a way that is so politically correct and abstract that no one can understand what they are really getting at. Excuse me, but Hilary Clinton saying she loves the American worker doesn’t tell me anything.

I am glad that people are talking and it is nice to see some healthy debate going on. We are hearing some very blunt opinions and I think that is refreshing. The only problem is that we are getting all fired up over something that is not that big of a deal.

The words coming out of Barack Obama’s mouth should be a much bigger deal than the words coming out of the mouth of his preacher. The only problem is that the words coming out of Obama’s mouth probably don’t reflect his actual views.

In my mind, politics need to be about conversation. It needs to be back and forth. We need to understand the opposition to understand our own opinions.

I don’t agree with some of the things the Rev. Wright stated, but at least I know why that is.

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