Dine or Dash: House of Tibet

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Dine or Dash: House of Tibet

Dinner at House of Tibet featuring Spicy Potatoes (Photo by Kate Button I Daily Utah Chronicle)

Dinner at House of Tibet featuring Spicy Potatoes (Photo by Kate Button I Daily Utah Chronicle)

Dinner at House of Tibet featuring Spicy Potatoes (Photo by Kate Button I Daily Utah Chronicle)

Dinner at House of Tibet featuring Spicy Potatoes (Photo by Kate Button I Daily Utah Chronicle)

By Kate Button, Arts Writer

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Off the stretches of State Street lies House of Tibet. This quaint restaurant is easy to miss as it easily blends into its surroundings. Yet, upon crossing its threshold, the aromas of comforting foods and welcoming spices invite you to take a seat and settle in for a night filled with delicious foods. 

 

The Ingredients

Vegetable Chow Mein at House of Tibet (Photo by Kate Button I Daily Utah Chronicle)

Tibetan cuisine is typically known for its blend of Indian, Nepalese and Chinese influences as these neighboring areas seep into the local culture. While not exclusively vegetarian, Tibetan foods offer a wide range of options without meat — which is something I always appreciate when I try out new foods. 

To begin the night, my friend and I ordered the vegetable spring rolls and the traditional veggie steamed dumplings — also known as momos. The spring rolls were pretty standard, as compared to what you can get at most Asian restaurants, but the sauce it was paired with provided a new take that was a bit more tart and light. The momos, however, are one of my favorite dishes from House of Tibet. The dough is light and pillowy, the vegetables are comforting and filling, and the dipping sauce provides just enough spice to offset the subtle heaviness of the dish. 

The rest of the menu is separated along Tibetan and Indian delineations. For our entrees, we tried the vegetable chow mein and the spicy potatoes from each section, respectively. While a bit more Americanized, the chow mein offered an inviting blend of savory noodles and crisp vegetables. The spicy potatoes, however, were the true star of this round for me. Piled on top of a bed of rice, the potatoes were fluffy and light, and the Tibetan and Indian blend of spices brought them to a new level. While all of the food was filling and delicious, it did so without being heavy or too rich. 

On top of all of the food we tried, we also ordered pots of jasmine and soy chai teas. The jasmine tea was light and gentle, and the soy chai blend provided an irresistible balance between the sweet soy milk and the cinnamon spice blend in the chai. These teas were the perfect accompaniment to our meals as they offset the spice and lent a lighter air to the many plates and dishes stacked upon our table. 

Overall, the food we tried revealed just how delicious Tibetan food can be. The dishes were excellent and balanced, but the unique spice blends helped the food to stand out above the crowd. Besides the incredible food, the staff at House of Tibet have always been remarkably friendly, welcoming and accommodating. Whether you’re vegetarian, vegan, gluten-free, have an allergy or are simply new to Tibetan food, the people at House of Tibet are sure to help you find something you love at this restaurant. House of Tibet was originally founded in 1995, and since then, it has become a cult favorite among those who know where to find it.

 

The Verdict

Vegetable Momos at House of Tibet (Photo by Kate Button I Daily Utah Chronicle)

House of Tibet is easily one of my favorite hidden gems in Salt Lake City. It may seem a bit odd from the outside — it is located within a strip mall — but the food inside is full of love and light. As the price for each dish hovers around $8, the food here is incredibly affordable for the average broke college student — or just someone living on a budget. Additionally, House of Tibet offers a lunch buffet option for just $7, so if you’re hankering for some good food, House of Tibet is just the place to get large portions of delicious food for a low cost. Located just west of Liberty Park, House of Tibet is close to the University of Utah campus for students who may not have a car, but  is still far enough away to provide an escape from college life. 

 

Recommendations

Almost every time I have visited House of Tibet, I have ordered the vegetable momos and the spicy potatoes. These two items are incredibly unique to this restaurant, and I highly recommend both of them. 

 

5/5 stars

House of Tibet is located at 145 E 1300 S Salt Lake City, UT 84115

Dine in and takeout at houseoftibetutah.com

 

[email protected]

@kateannebutton