Frats begin spring recruitment week

Students+participate+in+formal+fraternity+recruitment+last+August.+Tuesday+was+the+first+day+of+formal+spring+recruitment.+Photo+by+Brent+Uberty.

Brent Uberty

Students participate in formal fraternity recruitment last August. Tuesday was the first day of formal spring recruitment. Photo by Brent Uberty.

Students participate in formal fraternity recruitment last August. Tuesday was the first day of formal spring recruitment. Photo by Brent Uberty.
Students participate in formal fraternity recruitment last August. Tuesday was the first day of formal spring recruitment. Photo by Brent Uberty.
U fraternities have been on the prowl for new members during recruitment this week.
Stuart Johnson, a senior in economics and finance, said being a member of the Phi Delta Theta fraternity has taught him a lot about life. Johnson joined the fraternity as a sophomore and became the chapter’s president less than a year later. Johnson said being a fraternity member is rewarding in more ways than one, especially considering he never planned to go greek.
“This house is diverse, and it’s full of a bunch of guys who never thought they’d be in a fraternity, like me,” he said.
Other members, such as the fraternity’s recruitment chair Connor Roberts, did plan on joining a fraternity. Roberts a sophomore in architecture, said he found exactly what he needed in Phi Delta Theta. He is looking for something special in the fraternity’s new members as recruitment comes to an end.
“As soon as we meet a kid, we get a vibe of whether he’s the kind of guy we’re looking for,” he said. “We make sure we’re the right fit for them and that they’re right for the house. We’re looking for guys that are not only good on paper, but have great personalities.”
Roberts said he considers everyone in his house his best friend, and he looks for that in recruitments as well.
The Beta Theta Pi fraternity has a more specific set of principles they use to look for their new members, principles they said contradict with what the media often portrays fraternities to be.
“Back in the ‘90s, fraternities were kinda going downhill,” said member Ryan Snow, a junior in business and administration. “Beta decided to change that downward trajectory, and they decided to go back to the roots, kind of what the founders based it upon.”
Current Beta president Mitchell Cox, a junior in psychology, believes their values set them apart from other fraternities.
“Beta Theta Phi is a fraternity that really grounds ourself in our five core values of mutual assistance, trust, responsible conduct, intellectual growth and integrity,” he said. “Really, overall, we just strive to live those out in our daily lives and to hold our brothers accountable to those same things.”
The Betas look for what they call “men of principle” who exhibit their core values. They aim to let people know their standards by offering a $500 scholarship every year to incoming freshmen. The scholarship’s recipient does not need to be interested in rushing to qualify.
Those interested in fraternities have a variety of reasons why they are interested in joining. Ryan Wadge, a sophomore in mechanical engineering, is hoping to branch out socially with his potential membership of Beta Theta Phi.
“I’ve always been really interested in greek life, and I love getting to know more people,” Wadge said. “I’ve had lots of friends in Beta, and I know that it’s a really solid frat.”
Parker Finlinson, a junior in marketing, is interested in Beta because of what the fraternity stands for.
“My roommate rushed last semester and said a lot of good things about what a fraternity should be, and I’m really interested in that,” he said.
Johnson believes the frat stereotype should not keep anyone from trying it out, and encourages people to have an open mind.
“Check out an event, talk to some of the guys, and if it’s not for you, that’s great. Give it a shot,” Johnson said. “Who knows? It might be the best decision you’ll ever make.”
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