Women of the Alt-Right

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Misogynistic, and highly populist and led unofficially led by Richard Spencer, the “alt-right” movement — a faction of people with extremely far-right idealogies —  expanded underneath values that President Donald Trump supported throughout the election. Preaching strict white ethnonationalism, the movement eerily resembles the Nazi party. During a rally in Washington D.C., members of the “alt-right” were filmed chanting “Hail Trump, hail our people, hail victory!” The “alt-right” has grown rapidly since Nov. 8, gaining additional momentum when the infamous Steve Bannon was chosen to become Trump’s Chief Strategist. Yet, despite their sudden rise, “alt-right” leaders recognize that there is additional recruiting to be coordinated.

This time, it includes attracting women to join the dark side.

Writers that identify as “alt-right” have termed the process of bringing females into the movement, giving women the “red pill.” And it is understandably difficult. At each rally that is held, supporters rattle about the importance of alpha-males, often suggesting that women hold little value in the working class. Instead, a woman’s place is frequently identified as in the kitchen — a disgraceful notion which marks a significant regression from past societal advances. Herein lies the issue with attracting women into the movement. However, this hasn’t stopped female “alt-righters” from attempting to teach men about the recruitment process.

Earlier this month, The Economist featured a story about two writers named Cecilia Davenport and Wolfie James. Although they each have unique styles, they share a common interest. According to The Economist’s story, “Mr. Spencer has said he believes women constitute around one-fifth of the movement’s followers.” Others who are familiar with the movement tend to agree that there is simply not enough representation of women in the group. That is where writers such as James and Davenport fit into the broader picture.

Through blogging, women in the “alt-right” are trying to gather others that are secretly partial to the movement. As Davenport wrote in response to The Economist, “You see ‘alt-right’ women a lot more at private gatherings…men are, by nature, more likely by nature to take risks: and there are real risks involved in being active in this cause.” Similar to others, Davenport recognizes that there is the potential to grow the movement’s female base. This prospect is exciting for a predominately white, heteronormative group of males that seeks the attention of women. Davenport continues by saying, “‘alt-righters’ want women to have the option to stay home and raise a family…,” making a sensible plea for women to support the cause. If one makes belonging at home a privilege, rather than a punishment, there will naturally be women curious about the movement.

Conversely, there are others who believe that women will need a significant push from their “alt-right” boyfriends to join the movement. Among those who believe this is Wolfie James, who wrote the original manual for red-pilling women. While I make reference to her work, I refrain from providing any direct link, as the article’s language is rather vulgar and distressing. With sections entitled, “Trigger her emotions; don’t try to win an argument,” “Fear monger,” and “Support her when she starts to embrace it,” James describes a step-by-step approach for men to recruit their partners. The manual’s rhetoric primarily uses fear as the catalyst for bringing skeptical women into the movement. It should be noted, though, that lacking from the guide is a strategy for “alt-right” men to actually attract women in the first place.

It’s difficult to fathom that a political movement aimed at restoring white male nationalism is actively attempting to recruit women. Yet, unofficial leaders such as Spencer are convinced that females are apt to join the cause — with a little nudge. Whether it be from Davenport and James or others hidden amongst a sea of alpha-males, there is a growing push to expand the party. To expand the notion that multiculturalism is rife with issues, and that only a white America is safe from the tyranny of diversity. This notion could not be farther from the truth — or worth anyone’s respect —regardless of gender or race.

letters@chronicle.utah.edu

2 COMMENTS

  1. You say that “the notion that multiculturalism is rife with issues” is not worth anyone’s respect. Yet it is clear that multiculturalism is causing problems. Take Rotherham, England, where thousands of young British schoolgirls were groomed and raped by Pakistani gangs for years, and the politically-correct police force was afraid to stop them for fear of being called “racist.” Or Cologne, Germany, where a New Year’s eve celebration was marred by mass gang assaults of young women by Arab men, which again the police and the media covered up due to “racism” fears.

    It is evident that proponents of multiculturalism are happy silence thousands of women, simply because they were raped by non-whites. If you are a woman, does that seem reasonable or fair to you?

  2. Your writing is very bad. Also, if you want to just examine “issues” with multiculturalism, you might start with taking a look at modern South Africa. Are you aware of the tens of thousands of brutal rapes and murders of whites by blacks there? The thousands of grisly farm murders? The fact that BEE (Black Economic Empowerment: i.e. affirmative action in a country eighty percent black) cuts almost a third of the whites out of th elabour pool, so that they live in deplorable conditions in squatter camps? The fact that EFF leader Julius Malema has hinted of a massacre of whites? That he and President Jacob Zuma (Who likes to sing the banned song “Kill the Boer” (White Afrikaner) and “Bring Me My Machine Gun.”) has called for expropriation of ALL white land without monetary compensation? yes, handing power over to a rival ethnic group that mostly HATES you is always a good idea, isn’t it?

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