Spring kayaking is a great way to celebrate the holidays

The holiday weekend has arrived where we celebrate the resurrection of Jesus Christ by looking for eggs from a rabbit. I am seriously baffled by this one: Jesus, who at one level was a human and obviously did not come out of a chicken’s egg, at another level is thought to not have even been conceived at all. Also, rabbits, being mammals like us humans, don’t lay eggs. So, do like the rest of us and just nod your heads and play along.

Actually, if you wanted to play, there are Easter egg hunts for children all over the city. I’m sure they wouldn’t mind a few college kids showing up and sharing in the fun.

MADD (Mothers Against Drunk Driving) and the Associated Students of University of Utah are having a little shindig in front of the Union on Thursday. Curiously enough, they have an obstacle course for you to attempt to swagger your way through-that sure sounds like something that getting drunk and going to wouldn’t be fun to do at all.

Speaking of liquids, it’s kayaking season. For those of you who enjoy this horrifying sport, consisting of floating through Class 5 rapids in a small plastic boat, probably upside down, there are plenty of places around to do so.

The Weber River is a well known local spot to go boating. Right now the flow isn’t great, but apparently if the water is at around 200 cubic feet per second, then it’s doable. The best place to kayak on the Weber River around here is accessible at the west Hennefer exit and on I-80. Just so you know, there’s a really good hamburger place right there called Taggart’s where you can get takeout.

The Weber is a Class 2 river, with a possible Class 3 section, but it’s not likely this time of year. It’s a dam-released river, so it varies from day to day as to whether it’s good or not. You can check out the water flow on the Weber and just about any other river in and around Utah on Wasatch Touring’s Web site, www.wasatchtouring.com. Wasatch Touring is a good place to get equipment if you need any. They actually have some good deals on used boats right now.

If you’re interested in finding out about everything to paddle in Utah, there is a book on it called Utah Whitewater by Gary Nichols, which is your best bet. If you’re interested in learning how to kayak or you don’t have your boat out here and want to go, you can rent every thing you need from the Outdoor Recreation Program for $15. For a better selection in boats, you can go to Wasatch Touring and it will run you about $25. There are always rolling clinics for around $8 all over Salt Lake City, and you can find out where they are in the back of “Sports Guide,” which can be found by the automatic doors in every supermarket-which reminds me…Has anyone ever noticed the automatic doors at the top entrance of the Fred Meyer near campus? For some reason I can’t figure out (probably like the Easter bunny thing) why they decided to alternate which side of the entrance they would place their automatic doors. Because of this, if you have a shopping cart, you must diagonally cross the lobby area between the sets of doors to get outside.

Anyway, there is a free tram ride to the top of Snowbird on Easter morning for a church service. Unfortunately, you have to get there before 6 a.m. to have a chance at making it on to the last tram, which goes up at 6:30.

Waking up that early will surely make you hungry so I suggest catching lunch at a place called The Sconecutter, with nine locations around the valley. This place features sandwiches on scones, which are very good, as well as whatever else you might want to put on a scone. The food is good and it’s not overly expensive, so check it out. And get this, all those tea-drinking, scone-eating people in England don’t eat peanut butter and jelly. They think they’re both great on their own, but disgusting together.

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