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The University of Utah's Independent Student Voice

The Daily Utah Chronicle

The University of Utah's Independent Student Voice

The Daily Utah Chronicle

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Want your voice to be heard? Submit a letter to the editor, send us an op-ed pitch or check out our open positions for the chance to be published by the Daily Utah Chronicle.
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Fiscal responsibility

By Matthew Gardner

It seems that critics are more fixated on Danny Schechter’s resemblance to Michael Moore than the quality of his films.

Schechter, also known as the “News Dissector” in the world of journalism, presented his documentary, “In Debt We Trust: America Before the Bubble Burst,” to a handful of Utah students and faculty members last Friday. The film that Variety Magazine called “provocative” portrays a nation crippled by credit card companies and other lenders. So what happens when this borrowed-money bubble bursts? Schechter conjectures that another Great Depression could arrive.

Along with “In Debt We Trust,” Schechter introduced another documentary titled, “A Work in Progress”–a biopic of his own life.

“I told my story to a friend of mine who is a producer, and she told me that we should work together and make a film about, me?I just hope people like it,” he said.

Schechter’s career began at Boston’s leading rock station, WBCN. Later, Schechter became a producer for ABC News’ “20/20.” He won two national Emmys and was nominated for two others. He had the opportunity to march with Martin Luther King Jr. in Washington, work with Dick Cheney and watch Africa progress with the release of Nelson Mandela.

However, despite his impressive rsum, he quit working for the large broadcasting corporation because he felt that the American people were not receiving “real” news.

“I started Global Vision and became an independent filmmaker because I felt that the truth was not being heard,” he said.

Schechter’s biopic portrayed a strong message of the power of freedom of speech.

He said, “I want to show people that the mainstream approach is not the only approach.”

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