The University of Utah's Independent Student Voice

The Daily Utah Chronicle

The University of Utah's Independent Student Voice

The Daily Utah Chronicle

The University of Utah's Independent Student Voice

The Daily Utah Chronicle

Write for Us
Want your voice to be heard? Submit a letter to the editor, send us an op-ed pitch or check out our open positions for the chance to be published by the Daily Utah Chronicle.
@TheChrony
Print Issues
Write for Us
Want your voice to be heard? Submit a letter to the editor, send us an op-ed pitch or check out our open positions for the chance to be published by the Daily Utah Chronicle.
@TheChrony
Print Issues

Letter: Take the Bible literally, but in proper context

Editor:In a recent Chronicle column (“God hates gay people, right?: Taking the Bible literally leads to skewed conclusions,” Feb. 22), Jay Richards decried the literal application of the Bible because “taking the Bible literally leads to skewed conclusions.” Richards went on to provide several examples of Bible verses which, when read at face value, seemed utterly outrageous. In so doing, however, Richards fell into the same error as the gay-bashing Westboro Baptist Church to which he referred: failing to interpret the Bible in context. Specifically, Richards’ column demonstrated an all-too-common lack of basic understanding of Old Testament as opposed to New Testament scripture.All the verses Richards quoted are from the Old Testament books of law, which applied to Hebrews more than 2,000 years ago. A closer examination through the entire Bible reveals that the events of the New Testament negate and supersede many laws of the Old Testament. For example, in the New Testament book of John, a certain women was convicted of adultery and sentenced to stoning according to the Old Testament law. However, Jesus came to her aid by saying that anybody who was perfect could throw the first stone — thus superseding the old laws.Furthermore, in the process of arguing against literal Bible interpretation, Richards loses out on the positive effects of directly applicable New Testament scriptures. For example, what would happen if more people would “love your neighbor as yourself” or “do good to those who hate you?” Literal application of the Bible is indeed dangerous, but only if an individual fails to understand contextually what he or she reads.

Darren Van CleaveSenior, Meteorology

Leave a Comment

Comments (0)

The Daily Utah Chronicle welcomes comments from our community. However, the Daily Utah Chronicle reserves the right to accept or deny user comments. A comment may be denied or removed if any of its content meets one or more of the following criteria: obscenity, profanity, racism, sexism, or hateful content; threats or encouragement of violent or illegal behavior; excessively long, off-topic or repetitive content; the use of threatening language or personal attacks against Chronicle members; posts violating copyright or trademark law; and advertisement or promotion of products, services, entities or individuals. Users who habitually post comments that must be removed may be blocked from commenting. In the case of duplicate or near-identical comments by the same user, only the first submission will be accepted. This includes comments posted across multiple articles. You can read more about our comment policy at https://dailyutahchronicle.com/comment-faqs/.
All The Daily Utah Chronicle Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *