GOP has work to do at convention

By By Heather Berg and By Heather Berg

By Heather Berg

With the Republican National Convention underway there are a lot of exciting things to hear from the various speakers in the Republican Party. Democrats and Republicans alike were shocked to see the vice president choice John McCain made Friday.

There is a lot to learn about Sarah Palin, the Idaho native, mother of five and governor of Alaska. As the Republican convention continues this week, people across America will see what she is all about, including her voting record, policies and personal life.

Palin has a reputation of striking down corruption in government, getting rid of unnecessary spending and writing checks back to the Alaskan people8212;putting the money back where it belongs.

She has proven herself to be a fierce woman and willing to stand up for what she believes is right without backing down. In the short time since being picked as McCain’s running mate, Palin has already become a role model for many college women. She certainly has more credentials than critics give her credit for, and the convention will give her the opportunity to prove that.

Several topics besides Palin need to be addressed, however. Of the many issues, I hope the following are stressed: an anti-abortion commitment, a clear energy policy, an invitation to young Republicans, a return to conservative principles and a unification of the party behind a Sen. McCain.

Commitment to the right to life is an ever-important issue that must be stressed. There are many abortion rights proponents considering voting for the Republican ticket this election. This is one issue, however, on which there should be no compromise. A solid and strong front should be upheld even under pressure.

Energy independence has quickly become one of the foremost problems facing the United States. McCain needs to present a clear and concise evaluation of what the GOP will do, and more importantly, how it will do it. Explanations of how the party plans to achieve alternative sources of energy cannot just be thrown out there with ambiguity, but needs a precise explanation of plans. Whether it is nuclear power, natural gas or off-shore drilling, America wants answers with numbers that not only make sense, but are possible.

Younger Republicans also need to be addressed at the RNC. The Obama campaign has shown the United States that the youth of America need to be taken seriously. Unfortunately, the GOP has been slower on the curve and have lost many young voters (to the excitement and charisma of Obama) whose beliefs are more accurately reflected by the GOP. Unless this is corrected, this could grow into a larger problem for the future of the party. McCain should use the convention to reach out to young, possibly disaffected conservatives.

A return to the conservative principles that the Republican Party was built on is a must. Conservative beliefs such as lower taxation, the right to life and the right to bear arms are just some of those core values Republicans should stand for. Although on the surface these principles have generally been upheld, a consistent application of them has been less certain in past years.

Most importantly, the Republican Party must unify behind McCain. As the Democratic Party makes a call to unity within their realm of registered Democrats, as seen repeatedly at the Democratic National Convention with Hillary Clinton leading the way for unity with her speech, the RNC must make the same efforts. Republicans need to come together in our grand old party and work toward our common goals throughout the rest of the convention as well as the future. Between addressing Iraq, the Palin selection and energy plans, this upcoming week is sure to be exciting.

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Editor’s Note8212;Heather Berg is the Chairwoman of the U College Republicans.

Heather Berg