Students still ?cop a feel? without cookies

By By Katie Valentine

By Katie Valentine

A bake sale fundraiser for Breast Cancer Awareness Month went on without baked goods.

The student group, Colleges Against Cancer, advertised its fundraiser as “Cop a Feel for Cancer,” planning on selling cookies shaped like breasts. But two weeks before Tuesday’s event took place, Ted Sablay, president of Colleges Against Cancer, found out that baked goods could not be sold inside the Union. Chartwells has a contract with the Union that doesn’t allow other food items to be sold inside of it.

Instead, Sablay set up a booth and talked to students about checking for breast cancer and gave information about the disease. The student group’s goals aren’t measured in the amount of donations, Sablay said. Instead, the members focus on teaching about cancer.
“We promote cancer education and awareness,” Sablay said.

But visiting students could still “cop a feel,” as advertised, to educate themselves about the warning signs of breast cancer. At Tuesday’s event, Sablay had a mold of a breast with a tumor in it. Students were able to feel what a potential tumor might feel like. Knowing the warning signs to look out for can prevent the growth of the cancer. Women are taught in their teens by doctors how to start checking for suspicious lumps. Men are encouraged to check too, since they can also get breast cancer.

“It’s a heartbreaking thing if someone goes to the doctor because they feel bad, then find out they can’t do anything about it,” Sablay said.

Preventive care is one of the best cancer treatments, he said.

Students who have healthy eating habits, exercise and schedule regular check ups diminish their chances of developing cancer.

“Everyone knows how to eat right and exercise, but nobody does it,” Sablay said.

It’s unknown how much money could have been raised if the bake sale had been able to go forward. Chartwells has exclusive rights with the Union to be the only vendor in the building, said Mike Van Oordt, administrative officer for contracts. Some of the other buildings Chartwells has exclusive rights with are the Marriott Library, University Service Building and the Heritage Center.

In the past, there have been times when Reggie Conerly, region director for Chartwells, has given permission to student groups to have outside food during events if cleared before the event, Van Oordt said.

Colleges Against Cancer is only a couple of years old and already has 200 members. The group has monthly meetings and hosts an event each month on cancer awareness. The members also participate in community events, such as last week’s Strides against Breast Cancer Walk at Liberty Park. They host an event in the spring called Relay for Life.

Relay for Life is an all-night event hosted on the Union Plaza. Teams register and camp out while rotating taking turns around a path lit by candles.

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