The University of Utah's Independent Student Voice

The Daily Utah Chronicle

The University of Utah's Independent Student Voice

The Daily Utah Chronicle

The University of Utah's Independent Student Voice

The Daily Utah Chronicle

Write for Us
Want your voice to be heard? Submit a letter to the editor, send us an op-ed pitch or check out our open positions for the chance to be published by the Daily Utah Chronicle.
@TheChrony
Print Issues

We’re All About To Lose Our Minds At ‘Saltburn’

See Fennell’s “Saltburn” in theaters now. Don’t get lost in Saltburn.
Saltburn+%28Courtesy+Amazon+Prime%29
Saltburn (Courtesy Amazon Prime)

Travel back to 2007

Emerald Fennell, director of 2020s “Promising Young Women,” has a new film out in theaters called “Saltburn.” Premiering at the Telluride Film Festival in August 2023, “Saltburn” quickly garnered attention for its bright visuals and polarizing story.

Saltburn is the family castle of Felix Catton, played by Jacob Elordi, who comes from generations of wealth. After a brief encounter at Oxford University, Oliver Quick, played by Barry Keoghan, finds acceptance and friendship with Catton and his friends. His relationship with Catton’s cousin Farleigh Start, played by Archie Madekwe, stays awkward. The college scenes are very relatable and the beginning montage with voice over by Keoghan will no doubt be popular for years to come.

When it comes time for summer break Catton invites Quick to join him at his home, Saltburn. Quick, who claims to have a tough family life, gladly accepts the invitation.

(Courtesy of Amazon Prime Video)

‘We’re all cold blooded here’

The rest of the film is a gradual spiral and display of unreliable narrator both in the characters and director. Both the characters and the beginning of the film set up the story to place Catton’s family as the bad guys, but this turns out not to be the case. If anything, the Catton family is too normal and not particularly bright — spending nights singing karaoke to “Low” by Flo Rida while dressed in thousand-dollar suits. Upon arrival at Saltburn, things slowly unravel to the sinister.

Speaking of music, “Saltburn” has a great soundtrack. The score by Anthony Willis is beautiful and serves the movie well. Other songs throughout the film are classic 2000s pop songs such as “Mr. Brightside” by The Killers.

Above all else, “Saltburn” is a beautiful and colorful film. The Saltburn Castle is stunning, as are the costumes and set design. Casting was knocked out of the park with this film. Elordi and Keoghan remain ones to watch.

(Courtesy of Out on Film)

Beware the Moth

“Saltburn” was a very well-made film, but at the end of the day, the topics will remain a controversial matter for audiences. I can’t say much about the most interesting part of the film, because that would essentially spoil it all, sadly. In “Saltburn,” morals are tested in psychotic ways and, by the end of the film, not-good things occur. It’s not worth the watch if you can’t sit through those scenes. I don’t think Fennel gives much reason or redeemable qualities for all the bad.

See Fennell’s “Saltburn” in theaters now. Don’t get lost in Saltburn.

(Courtesy of Amazon Prime)

Leave a Comment
About the Contributor
Haley Freeman, Arts Writer
Haley Freeman is a sophomore mechanical engineering major at the University of Utah. She was born and raised in the Washington, D.C. area, and now is based out of South Carolina, when not traveling or at the U. She enjoys all things ballet, film, photography, and literature. When not writing for the paper, you can catch Haley working sage tech at the Marriott Center for Dance, spending time with her Alpha Chi Omegas, or frolicking in the snow.

Comments (0)

We welcome feedback and dialogue from our community. However, when necessary, The Daily Utah Chronicle reserves the right to remove user comments. Posts may be removed for any of the following reasons: • Comments on a post that do not relate to the subject matter of the story • The use of obscene, threatening, defamatory, or harassing language • Comments advocating illegal activity • Posts violating copyrights or trademarks • Advertisement or promotion of commercial products, services, entities, or individuals • Duplicative comments by the same user. In the case of identical comments only the first submission will be posted. Users who habitually post comments or content that must be removed can be blocked from the comment section.
All The Daily Utah Chronicle Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *