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The Daily Utah Chronicle

The University of Utah's Independent Student Voice

The Daily Utah Chronicle

The University of Utah's Independent Student Voice

The Daily Utah Chronicle

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Want your voice to be heard? Submit a letter to the editor, send us an op-ed pitch or check out our open positions for the chance to be published by the Daily Utah Chronicle.
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Dear Salt Lake City, We’re Coming Out!

The community truly would not be where we are without our LGBTQIA+ elders, so thank you to all those who came before for being so strong and to those who keep the fight going.
Parade+goers+cheer+for+parade+participants+during+the+2024+Utah+Pride+Parade+in+downtown+Salt+Lake+City+on+Friday%2C+June+2%2C+2024.+%28Photo+by+Marco+Lozzi+%7C+The+Daily+Utah+Chronicle%29
Marco Lozzi
Parade goers cheer for parade participants during the 2024 Utah Pride Parade in downtown Salt Lake City on Friday, June 2, 2024. (Photo by Marco Lozzi | The Daily Utah Chronicle)

 

This weekend kicked off the 47th annual celebration of Pride in Utah. Organized by Utah Pride Center, Equality Utah and hundreds of volunteers, this event started the celebration off right. I had the privilege of attending the parade on Saturday, and what a joy it was. It was wonderful to see so many come out on their Saturday morning to wave flags around and shout as loud as possible for all to know that we are here and we are queer.

True Colors Shining Through 

The festival began with a rally at the Utah State Capitol where people gathered together to celebrate how far the community has come after all these years. Each speech was full of love and compassion to the trailblazers who created the path we are on today. The community truly would not be where we are without our LGBTQIA+ elders, so thank you to all those who came before for being so strong and to those who keep the fight going.

After the final speaker closed their remarks, we then were lead down, marching in the street to Washington Square and ambushed the festival with all our glory, as was intended. On the way down there were stands handing out even more glam in the form of pins, flags, sparkles, tattoos, etc., all to show off our colors to the world. 

I Have One Thing to Say: You Better ‘Werk’

Throughout the march, the atmosphere was so vibrant and colorful as all attendees were draped in flags, tutus and rainbow spandex. If there’s one thing about the LGBTQ+ community, it’s that the fashion will never die. Some of the best dressed were obviously the drag queens in attendance, strutting and showing off their moves gaining attention for their upcoming performances this Pride Month. 

Walking around the park you would hear so many compliments such as “Get it” and “Yasss queen” all around. It truly is such an inclusive space with so many hot people surrounding, one can be taken aback quickly by the overwhelming environment.

It wasn’t just hot because of the heat, but the attendees were definitely making me red. 

We’re Creating a Culture of Yes

If the fashion wasn’t enough for you to say yes, then while at the festival I’m sure the striking performances and vendor stations held by our local queer artists would catch your attention. This year created luxurious amounts of opportunity to share works from the voices of this community that are unheard more often than not. While I was in attendance, there were a few musical performances from artists, which for some was their first time performing in public. It was an honor to be in such a space full of talented, vulnerable people.

The air was fresh and filled to the brim with inclusivity. All in attendance were from so many different backgrounds and stories. Walking around the park, so many stories were told through art which included a wide range of visual art, jewelry, clothing and many other forms. Some of these were highly influenced by artists’ growing-up in Utah as a queer person and how the ups and downs of life here has made them brighter and stronger. It was incredibly community-based, which followed the statements made from the very beginning: “Love and equality are what make Utah strong.”

 

[email protected]

@laneypauline_

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About the Contributors
Laney Hansen
Laney Hansen, Arts Writer
Laney is a communications major with a modern dance minor at the University of Utah. Originally based from South Jordan, Utah, Laney has always been drawn to the creativity of the arts in Salt Lake and other surrounding towns. One of their favorite parts is the large local music scene. This is one reason why Laney joined the Chronicle: to open people’s eyes to the wonderful world of Utah-based musicians and artists galore. Other than head banging at your favorite local venue, you can find Laney running, hiking, dancing, or just reading a good book on the commute up to campus.
Marco Lozzi
Marco Lozzi, Photographer
(he/him) Born in Texas and raised by Italian parents, Marco Lozzi grew up with two vastly different cultures. Now at the U, he is majoring in communication with an emphasis in journalism while also minoring in photography and Italian. He works as a photojournalist covering everything from protests on campus to scientific research in the Arctic. When he's not taking or editing photos, he can be found hitting the slopes, napping or making pasta.

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