Greek Recruitment Begins at the U

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(Photo by Dane Goodwin)

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(Photo by Dane Goodwin)
(Photo by Dane Goodwin)

 

Greek recruitment has been in full swing at the U since the first day of school.

Members from the 17 different chapters on campus have been out and about promoting both sorority and fraternity life to interested students, with tables around the Union lawn.

Laura Byl, a freshman in psychology, was among the curious students who approached the Greek recruitment information table. She said joining a sorority seemed like a lot of fun.

“I’m from Parowan, a really small town in Southern Utah,” Byl said. “I think joining a sorority will help me establish a social life here on campus. I want to be part of a group. I like the idea of a sisterhood.”

Kevin Heiner, vice president of administration for the Interfraternity Council, said the efforts of the council to reach out to students have not gone unnoticed.

“We currently have somewhere in the 500- to 600-person range of students who have expressed interest in participating in Greek life,” Heiner said. “But we are looking to expand that number in the coming weeks.”

The Interfraternity Council, which provides oversight to fraternities on campus, has planned a series of events to attract more interest in the coming weeks. Men’s recruitment is ongoing until Sept. 10. Each chapter has arranged events for potential members to participate in, including slip ‘n’ slides and poker nights.

The Panhellenic Council, charged with overseeing the sorority life of the campus, has also put together a series of events for recruitment. Women’s recruitment will take place from Sept. 5 to Sept. 9. The week will begin with Panhellenic Day, where potential new members will tour the chapter houses and become familiar with the community. The week will continue up to “bid day” where potential new members will officially join their chapter.

Fraternities and sororities each have rules and standards that must be met for membership. Besides paying dues, which vary in amount depending on chapter, GPA standards must be maintained in order for membership to remain active.

Each chapter also has a philanthropy project they sponsor. The Huntsman Cancer Institute, Camp Hobé, Sight Conservation and First Book are among the organizations that have partnered with U sororities and fraternities.

Nathan Peterson, chapter president for Phi Delta Theta, said participating in Greek life has changed his college experience for the better.

“Greek life can enrich every aspect of your life,” Peterson stated. “There are lots of people who like to say that Greeks think they are better than everyone else, and that’s not true. What is true is that I know I am better than who I was before I joined Phi Delta Theta because of who I chose to surround myself with, my brothers.”

Cassie Eley, a junior in health promotion and education working as a recruitment counselor, said she moved from Colorado to attend the U and said joining a sorority helped her connect with people on campus.

“When I first got here I had no friends. I didn’t know anybody,” Eley said. “I didn’t decide to join a sorority until my second year, and it changed everything. I now have a group of best friends who I can laugh, cry and have fun with. They are my support system.”

The first fraternity at the U was established in the fall of 1909, and the first sorority was established soon after in 1913. Today the U is home to 10 nationally accredited fraternities and seven nationally accredited sororities. 

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@mary_royal

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(Photo by Dane Goodwin)
(Photo by Dane Goodwin)

 
Greek recruitment has been in full swing at the U since the first day of school.
Members from the 17 different chapters on campus have been out and about promoting both sorority and fraternity life to interested students, with tables around the Union lawn.
Laura Byl, a freshman in psychology, was among the curious students who approached the Greek recruitment information table. She said joining a sorority seemed like a lot of fun.
“I’m from Parowan, a really small town in Southern Utah,” Byl said. “I think joining a sorority will help me establish a social life here on campus. I want to be part of a group. I like the idea of a sisterhood.”
Kevin Heiner, vice president of administration for the Interfraternity Council, said the efforts of the council to reach out to students have not gone unnoticed.
“We currently have somewhere in the 500 to 600-person range of students who have expressed interest in participating in Greek life,” Heiner said. “But we are looking to expand that number in the coming weeks.”
The Interfraternity Council, which provides oversight to fraternities on campus, has planned a series of events to attract more interest in the coming weeks. Men’s recruitment is ongoing until Sept. 10. Each chapter has arranged events for potential members to participate in. Planned events include slip n’ slides and poker nights.
The Panhellenic Council, charged with overseeing the sorority life of the campus, has also put together a series of events for recruitment. Women’s recruitment will take place from Sept. 5 to Sept. 9. The week will begin with Panhellenic Day where potential new members will tour the chapter houses and become familiar with the community. The week will continue up to “bid day” where potential new members will officially join their chapter.
Fraternities and sororities each have rules and standards that must be met for membership. Besides paying dues, which vary in amount depending on chapter, GPA standards must be maintained in order for membership to remain active.
Each chapter also has a philanthropy project which they sponsor. The Huntsman Cancer Institute, Camp Hobé, Sight Conservation and First Book are among the few organizations that have partnered with U sororities and fraternities.
Nathan Peterson, chapter president for Phi Delta Theta, said participating in Greek life has changed his college experience for the better.
“Greek life can enrich every aspect of your life,” Peterson stated. “There are lots of people who like to say that Greeks think they are better than everyone else, and that’s not true. What is true is that I know I am better than who I was before I joined Phi Delta Theta because of who I chose to surround myself with, my brothers.”
Cassie Eley, a junior in health promotion and education working as a recruitment counselor, said she moved from Colorado to attend the U and said joining a sorority helped her connect with people on campus.
“When I first got here I had no friends. I didn’t know anybody,” Eley said. “I didn’t decide to join a sorority until my second year and it changed everything. I now have a group of best friends who I can laugh, cry and have fun with. They are my support system.”
The first fraternity at the U was established in the fall of 1909 and the first sorority was established soon after in 1913. Today the U is home to ten nationally accredited fraternities and seven nationally accredited sororities.
[email protected]
@mary_royal[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]