ASUU Candidates Talk Constitution, Platforms

%28Courtesy+of+Jack+Bender%2C+ASUU%29
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ASUU Candidates Talk Constitution, Platforms

(Courtesy of Jack Bender, ASUU)

(Courtesy of Jack Bender, ASUU)

(Courtesy of Jack Bender, ASUU)

(Courtesy of Jack Bender, ASUU)

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(Courtesy of Jack Bender, ASUU)

(Courtesy of Jack Bender, ASUU)

The candidates for ASUU president and vice president debated about their platforms and the U’s student constitution in the Hinckley Institute of Politics on Monday.

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Current ASUU President Justin Spangler and Vice President Madison Black posed questions to the candidates from the two parties, Empower and Snow. Each side was given two minutes to respond. The topic of conversation centered on each party’s goals for office. The Snow Party’s platform focuses on transparency with student fees and creating a collaborative atmosphere on campus. Ambra Jackson, Snow’s candidate for president, said she is impressed by the diversity at the U.

“The U has the most receptive campus of this level of institution in the state,” Jackson said. “We would like to bring awareness to microaggressions on campus and make everyone feel safe and welcome.”

The Empower Party’s presidential candidate, Satin Tashnizi, said their platform advocates for mental health awareness and polling stations around the U.

“We wanted [to] … let students know that they have the power and they aren’t irrelevant,” she said.

Once the debate was opened up to questions from the audience, hands shot up. One question came from the current ASUU Attorney General Zach Strong, who asked how familiar each party is with the ASUU Constitution.

“It’s not the most exciting read you want on a Friday night,” said Camille Conerly, Empower’s vice president.

Tashnizi smiled at Conerly’s comment and added, “I want to make the constitution more colorful. It’s too black and white, and there’s so much to read.”

Anthony Fratto, Snow’s vice president, took direct aim at Tashnizi’s comment.

“We have read it many times, and we used it to create our platforms,” he said. “It is clear cut for a good reason. It was meant to be black and white so we know how to run [student government].”

After the debate students could vote using electronic polls set up outside of the Hinckley Institute. The winners will be announced Friday morning.

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